EuroEducation.Net
   The European Education Directory



Search 900+ Universities for Bachelor, Master, Diploma & Professional Courses

Match term in Index:


Use the SEARCH above or browse by country and program of study




Arts & Humanities


Business & Economics


Engineering & Technology


MBA & Management


Science





Denmark Higher Education System

Structure of the Higher Educational System in Denmark
Admissions to Higher Education in Denmark
Types of Higher Education Institutions in Denmark
Cycles of Higher Education in Denmark
 


Types of Higher Education Institutions


Danish higher education comprises a university sector, college sector and an academy sector. There are four types of institutions offering higher education programmes:

• Academies of professional higher education (offering short-cycle programmes)

• University Colleges (offering medium-cycle programmes)

• Universities (offering long-cycle programmes)

• University level institutions for educations in the arts

Structural changes on institutional level have affected parts of the system of higher education. All short-cycle higher educations are now concentrated in nine Academies of professional higher education (Erhvervsakademier). The majority of medium-cycle education is concentrated in 7 University Colleges (Professionshøjskoler).

The new university structure also includes eight universities, five of which are multi-faculty universities: University of Copenhagen, Aarhus University, Aalborg University, University of Southern Denmark and Rosikilde University.The other three universities specialise in fields such as engineering (the Technical University of Denmark), information technology (The IT-University) and business studies (Copenhagen Business School).

A number of university level institutions are regulated by the Danish Ministry of Culture and offer first, second and third cycle degree programmes in visual arts, music, cinematography, theater and performing arts. The bachelor, master and PhD programmes at these institutions are awarded 180, 120 and 180 ECTS, respectively. A higher education degree within theatre or cinematography is typically awarded after four years of study (240 ECTS). Music Academies offer a specialist degree of 2-4 years following the master's degree.


First Cycle Programmes


Since 2003, the two-cycle system consisting of a bachelor and a master has been fully implemented in the Danish long-cycle higher university education system. A university programme normally consists of a three-year bachelor degree programme corresponding to 180 ECTS, followed by a two-year programme leading to the Candidatus-degree (Master’s level) corresponding to 120 ECTS. In branches such as medicine, the two-year programme is extended to three years.

University colleges offer 3 to 4-year (180-240 ECTS) professionally oriented programmes at a level corresponding to a university bachelor, the Professional Bachelor (Professionsbachelor). The professional bachelor programmes usually prepare students for a specific profession.

The programmes provide students with theoretical knowledge as well as knowledge of application of theory to professions and industry. All programmes include compulsory periods of practical training/in-service training and require the submission of a project/project paper. Most programmes give access to further studies in the same field, e.g. a Master programme (Adult educational programme) or on certain conditions, a specific Master programme (kandidatuddannelse, third cycle).

The academy profession programmes (Erhvervsakademiuddannelse) is awarded after 1 ½ to 2 ½ years of study (90-150 ECTS) depending on the area of study. Students may, on certain conditions, be awarded credits if they continue in a medium- or long-cycle higher education programme. It is the aim of the programmes to qualify students for the performance of practical, vocational tasks on an analytical basis. The programmes have to meet the general needs for vocational qualifications.


Bachelor

Branches of Study

Since 2003, the two-cycle system of a bachelor- and a master level has been fully implemented in the Danish long-cycle higher university education system.

A university programme normally consists of a three-year bachelor degree programme corresponding to 180 ECTS, followed by a two-year programme leading to the Candidatus-degree (Master’s level) corresponding to 120 ECTS. In branches such as medicine, the two-year programme is extended to three years.

At the universities, the above mentioned degree programmes can be taken in a wide variety of different branches e.g.: the humanities (eskimology, applied linguistics, phonetics, languages, comparative literature, rhetoric etc.), natural sciences (statistics, actuarial science, astronomy, geophysics, meteorology etc.), social science (economics, political science, business economics, anthropology and sociology etc.), law, theology, health sciences (medicine, dentistry, human biology) and technical studies (engineering etc.).

University colleges offer 3- to 4-year (180-240 ECTS) professionally oriented programmes at a level corresponding to a university bachelor, the Professional Bachelor (Professionsbachelor). The professional bachelor programmes usually prepare students for a specific profession. Examples are: Teacher training programmes, programmes in social work, journalism, nursing, engineering etc.

The programmes provide students with theoretical knowledge as well as knowledge of application of theory to professions and industry. All programmes include compulsory periods of practical training/in-service training and require the submission of a project/project paper. Most programmes give access to further studies in the same field, e.g. a Master programme (Adult educational programme) or on certain conditions, a specific Master programme (kandidatuddannelse, third cycle).

Admission Requirements

Access to higher education in Denmark varies from programme to programme. Admission to most study programmes depends on the fulfilment of both general requirements and specific requirements.

The general admission requirement for all programmes at first cycle level is the completion of one of the qualifying examinations at upper secondary level:

• The upper secondary school leaving examination (studentereksamen)

• The higher prepatory examination (HF)

• The higher commercial examination (HHX)

• The higher technical examination (HTX)

All count as qualifying examinations at upper secondary level. Admission to a specific bachelor program requires in addition to the general admission requirements stipulated above certain subjects at level A, B or C and/or a practical test specified by the university. The specific admission requirement for each bachelor program is stipulated by The Ministry of Science, Innovation and Higher Education.

The specific requirements for admission to bachelor programmes have been changed from 2008, which means that pupils have to have completed more subjects and often subjects at higher levels in order to attend a specific bachelor programme.

Some schools, e.g. the film school, the school of journalism etc. have their own aptitude tests. However, in general, students are granted admission on the basis of the average mark obtained at the final examination at upper secondary level.

In general, the educational institutions are responsible for regulating the size of the student population themselves, including the specific number enrolled at each program. The Ministry of Science, Innovation and Higher Education can however determine the maximum number of students in a given programme.

The Coordinated Enrolment System (KOT) is responsible for coordinating the admission to the universities. Students are admitted to bachelor programmes on the basis of two quotas. Admission through quota 1 (kvote 1) depends exclusively on grades. Admission through quota 2 (kvote 2) depends on a number of different criteria, such as grades and work experience. The universities stipulate the criteria themselves.

Curriculum

According to the Act on Universities, the Director of Studies and universities' Study Boards are responsible for the practical organisation of teaching and assessments forming parts of the exams.

The Study Board shall ensure the organisation, realization and development of educational and teaching activities, including aims to:

• Assure and develop the quality of education and teaching and follow-up on evaluations of education and teaching

• Produce proposals for curricula and changes thereof

• Approve the organization of teaching and assessments forming part of the exams

• Handle applications concerning credit transfer and exemptions

• Make statements on all matters of importance to education and teaching as presented by the Rector or the person authorized by the Rector to do so

Common for all programmes at bachelor level is a bachelor project and instruction in theory of science and theory of scientific methods.The two subjects’ content is adjusted to the specific branch and specialization.

Professional bachelor programmes exist in the technical, educational, social, creative and health-related fields. They provide students with knowledge of theory and the application of theory to professions and industries. All programmes include periods of practical training and require the submission of a project paper. University Colleges may award the professional bachelor titles on completion of programmes that have been approved to meet a number of criteria. Among other things, the teaching must be rooted in the profession and its development and it must include links to national and international research.

A professional bachelor programme consists of compulsory educational elements as well as practical training of at least 30 ECTS. The compulsory educational elements and the practical training have to comprise at least 120 ECTS together. Also, the programme consist of electives of a maximum of 60 ECTS and a final project worth either 10, 15 or 20 ECTS.

Teaching Methods

Teaching in the first cycle level programmes is a combination of lectures and smaller group/class teaching. The teaching must encompass methods, which can develop the students’ independence and ability to create innovation.

The educational institutions may lay down provisions in the curriculum to the effect that the students are obliged to participate in the teaching.

The professional bachelor programmes and the academy profession programmes typically constitute an interaction between theory and practice and is organised in a combination of different forms of learning, including e.g. case studies, lectures and exercises, problem-oriented project work and practical training.

Teachers can choose their own teaching methods and materials.

Progression of Students

The main objective of examinations and tests are to assess whether, and to what extent, the students’ qualifications comply with the objectives, competences and academic requirements stipulated for the programme in the programme order, curriculum etc.

First-year students at universities must sit the tests which the curriculum stipulates are part of the first-year examination before the end of the first year of a programme in order to continue with the programme. Students who fail this examination may register for a new attempt in August. The tests at the end of the first year must be passed by the end of second year if the student is to continue with the programme.

The form of the tests must reflect the content and working methods of the course. The tests have to be organised as individual tests. In the case that two or more students write a paper together, the assessment has to be individual and it has to be evident who has written what part of the paper.

Students can as a maximum register for this examination three times. The institution may permit enrolment for a fourth and fifth time, if unusual circumstances warrant it.

With regards to the professional bachelor programmes, programmes which are nominated for up to 120 ECTS have to be completed within the number of years which corresponds to the nominated duration of the programme. Other programmes have to be completed within the number of years which corresponds to the nominated duration of the programme plus two years. The educational institutions can make exceptions from the last possible completion date if it is due to unusual reasons.

Employability

There are well established career guidance centers in almost all the universities and university colleges. These offer career guidance to all students and graduates. Many private and large companies offer in-company placements/trainee programmes which students have to apply for on the same terms as when applying for a normal job.

Student Assessment

For bachelor programmes at universities, tests have to be individual. Programmes have to contain a variation of different test formats, which have to reflect the content of the teaching and methods. These can be:

• Oral, written and practical tests

• Participation in teaching, courses, practical experiments etc.

• A combination of the above

• Project oriented courses, perhaps linked to areas outside the university in Denmark, or abroad

In programmes which are offered in Danish, tests have to be in Danish, unless it is part of the test's purpose to document the student's skills in a foreign language. However, the tests can be done in Swedish or Norwegian instead of in Danish, unless it is part of the test's purpose to document skills in the Danish language. If the teaching in a subject has been carried through in a foreign language, the tests also have to be in this language, unless it is part of the test's purpose to document the student's skills in another language. Universities can disregard this rule.

A passed test cannot be retaken by the student.

The student has three attempts to pass a test. The university can allow for further attempts if unusual circumstances allow this.

A professional bachelor programme consists of external as well as internal tests. The programme has to (at least) contain the following three tests: • One internal or external test which is taken before the end of 2. semester, and which has to document that the student has achieved the learning goals which have been stipulated for the first study year.

• One internal or external test which has to be taken after the student's completion of the programme's practical training, and which has to document that the student has achieved the learning goals which have been stipulated for the practical training.

• One external test in the final bachelor project which together with the test after the practical training and the programme's other tests have to document that the educational learning goals have been achieved.

The tests in the final bachelor project consist of a project and an oral examination. One grade is given.

Certification

On completion of the education, the higher education institutions issue a diploma, which indicates the examinations taken and the marks obtained as well as the title/degree awarded. The diploma must contain a description of the programme with an account of its subject-composition.

Students who leave a programme without having passed the final examination are entitled to documentation of the examinations passed.

In an annexe to the certificate, the institutions issue a Diploma Supplement in English, which in accordance with the standard model developed by the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES describes the competence provided by the programme, the contents, level and aim. The Diploma Supplement provides information about the institution, the place of the institution and the programme in the Danish education system.

With regards to the university bachelor programmes, the university issues certificates for successfully completed programmes. Graduates must receive their certificates within two months of the last test being completed and the result published.

In addition to the graduate’s name and the name of the university, the certificate must at least state:

• The title graduates are entitled to use in Danish and English

• The number of ECTS of the entire programme

• The subjects in which tests have been taken, or which have been documented in some other way, including the number of ECTS

• Tests for which credits have been transferred

• The examination language if the test has been taken in a foreign language

• The assessment obtained and if appropriate, the overall average examination result

• A profile, which describes the programme

University Colleges issue a diploma to students who have successfully completed their professional bachelor programme. In addition to information about the graduate’s name and the issuing authority, the diploma must as a minimum contain the following information:

• The educational elements in which the student has sat for an examination

• The assessments given

• Educational elements documented in other ways

• The individual educational elements cf. items 1 and 3, indicated in ECTS-point

• Examinations for which the student has obtained credit transfer

• The examination language, if the examination was taken in a foreign language, except for Norwegian and Swedish

• The title which the programme leads to

• The designation of the programme translated into English

The graduate can demand to have his or her diploma issued in English.


Short-Cycle Higher Education


Branches of Study

The academy profession programmes (Erhvervsakademiuddannelse) is awarded after 1 ½ to 2 ½ years of study (90-150 ECTS) depending on the area of study. Programmes within the following study fields are offered: biotechnology and laboratory technical, design professional, IT professional, social science, health professional, technical and the economic-commercial. Teaching is a combination of theory and practical experience.

Students may, on certain conditions, be awarded credits if they continue in a medium- or long-cycle higher education programme. It is the aim of the programmes to qualify students for the performance of practical, vocational tasks on an analytical basis. The programmes have to meet the general needs for vocational qualifications.

Admission Requirements

Access to higher education in Denmark varies from programme to programme. Admission to most study programmes depends on the fulfilment of both general requirements and specific requirements.

The general admission requirement for all programmes at first cycle level is the completion of one of the qualifying examinations at upper secondary level:

• The upper secondary school leaving examination (studentereksamen)

• The higher prepatory examination (HF)

• The higher commercial examination (HHX)

• The higher technical examination (HTX)

Admission can also take place on the basis of a relevant vocational education.

In general, the educational institutions are responsible for regulating the size of the student population themselves, including the specific number enrolled at each program. The Coordinated Enrolment System (KOT) is responsible for coordinating the admission to higher education.

Curriculum

An academy profession degree contains theoretical teaching at the educational institution as well as practical training at a company, either in Denmark or abroad. An academy profession programme consist of compulsory educational elements as well as at least 15 ECTS of practical training. The compulsory educational elements and the practical training have to comprise at least 75 ECTS.

Moreover, the programme has to consists of electives of a maximum of 30 ECTS and a final project worth 10 or 15 ECTS.

Teaching Methods

Teaching in the first cycle level programmes is a combination of lectures and smaller group/class teaching. The teaching must encompass methods, which can develop the students’ independence and ability to create innovation.

The educational institutions may lay down provisions in the curriculum to the effect that the students are obliged to participate in the teaching. The academy profession programmes constitute an interaction between theory and practice and is organised in a combination of different forms of learning, including e.g. case studies, lectures and exercises, problem-oriented project work and practical training.

Teachers can choose their own teaching methods and materials.

Progression of Students

The main objective of examinations and tests are to assess whether, and to what extent, the students’ qualifications comply with the objectives, competences and academic requirements stipulated for the programme in the programme order, curriculum etc.

Programmes which are nominated for up to 120 ECTS have to be completed within the number of years which corresponds to the nominated duration of the programme. Other programmes have to be completed within the number of years which corresponds to the nominated duration of the programme plus two years. The educational institutions can make exceptions from the last possible completion date if it is due to unusual reasons.

Employability

There are career guidance centers in almost all academies of professional higher education. These offer career guidance to all students and graduates.

Student Assessment

An academy profession programme consists of external as well as internal tests. The programme has to (at least) contain the following three tests: • One internal or external test which is taken before the end of 2. semester, and which has to document that the student has achieved the learning goals which have been stipulated for the first study year.

• One internal or external test which has to be taken after the student's completion of the programme's practical training, and which has to document that the student has achieved the learning goals which have been stipulated for the practical training.

• One external test in the final exam project which together with the test after the practical training and the programme's other tests have to document that the educational learning goals have been achieved.

The tests in the final exam project consist of a project and an oral examination. One grade is given.

Certification

On completion of the education, the higher education institutions issue a diploma, which indicates the examinations taken and the marks obtained as well as the title/degree awarded. The diploma must contain a description of the programme with an account of its subject-composition.

Students who leave a programme without having passed the final examination are entitled to documentation of the examinations passed.

In an annexe to the certificate, the institutions issue a Diploma Supplement in English , which in accordance with the standard model developed by the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES describes the competence provided by the programme, the contents, level and aim. Also, the Diploma Supplement provides information about the institution, the place of the institution and the programme in the Danish education system.

As mentioned above, the Academies of Professional Higher Education issue a diploma to students who have successfully completed their educational programme. In addition to information about the graduate’s name and the issuing authority, the diploma must as a minimum contain the following information:

• The educational elements in which the student has sat for an examination

• The assessments given

• Educational elements documented in other ways

• The individual educational elements cf. items 1 and 3, indicated in ECTS-point

• Examinations for which the student has obtained credit transfer

• The examination language, if the examination was taken in a foreign language, except for Norwegian and Swedish

• The title which the programme leads to

• The designation of the programme translated into English

The graduate can demand to have his or her diploma issued in English.


Second Cycle Programmes


Branches of Study

The master programme in Denmark is a two-year programme leading to the Candidatus-degree, corresponding to 120 ECTS. In branches such as medicine, the two-year programme is extended to three years.

If the student combines two different specialisations, for example History with Physics with the aim of obtaining qualifications to teach in the upper secondary school, the studies will be prolonged with 30 ECTS.

The master level is generally finalised with a master’s thesis of 30 ECTS. The thesis may, if it has an experimental character, be extended up to 60 ECTS. Master programmes are offered within the following study fields: humanities, natural science, social science, health science, technical science and theology.

Admission Requirements

Admission to a master program is a relevant bachelor program or other relevant Danish or foreign education on same level. The admission requirements are stipulated in the study program by the universities. Universities cannot admit students at the master programmes before the previous bachelor programme has been completed and passed.

Universities can admit students on a master programme on another basis than the above mentioned if the applicant has corresponding professional qualifications and the university believes that the applicant will be able to complete the programme.

In general, the universities are responsible for regulating the size of the student population themselves, including the specific number enrolled at each master programme. The Ministry of Science, Innovation and Higher Education can however determine the maximum number of students on a given master program.

Curriculum

Universities have a significant degree of academic freedom and autonomy with regards to the curriculum of the master programmes.

According to the Act on Universities, the Director of Studies and universities' Study Boards are responsible for the practical organisation of teaching and assessments forming parts of the exams.

The Study Board shall ensure the organisation, realization and development of educational and teaching activities, including aims to:

• Assure and develop the quality of education and teaching and follow-up on evaluations of education and teaching

• Produce proposals for curricula and changes thereof

• Approve the organization of teaching and assessments forming part of the exams

• Handle applications concerning credit transfer and exemptions

• Make statements on all matters of importance to education and teaching as presented by the Rector or the person authorized by the Rector to do so.

In the master’s thesis, the students must document skills in applying academic theory and methods to a specific academic subject.

Teaching Methods

The universities may lay down provisions in the curriculum to the effect that the students are obliged to participate in the teaching.

Teaching can consists of class room teaching, lectures, one-to-one consultation, group work and seminars. Teachers can choose their own teaching methods and materials.

Progression of Students

The main objective of examinations and tests are to assess whether, and to what extent, the students’ qualifications comply with the objectives, competences and academic requirements stipulated for the programme in the programme order, curriculum etc.

The form of the tests must reflect the content and working methods of the course. The tests have to be organised as individual tests. In the case that two or more students write a paper together, the assessment has to be individual and it has to be evident who has written what part of the paper. The student has three attempts to pass a test.

Employability

There are well established career guidance centers in almost all the universities. These offer career guidance to all students and graduates. Many private and large companies offer in-company placements/trainee programmes which students have to apply for on the same terms as when applying for a normal job. Student Assessment

Tests have to be individual. Programmes have to contain a variation of different tests forms, which have to reflect the content of the teaching and methods. These can

• Oral, written and practical tests

• Participation in teaching, courses, practical experiments etc.

• A combination of the above

• Project oriented courses, perhaps linked to areas outside the university in Denmark, or abroad

In programmes which are offered in Danish, tests have to be in Danish, unless it is part of the test's purpose to document the student's skills in a foreign language. However, the tests can be done in Swedish or Norwegian instead of in Danish, unless it is part of the test's purpose to document skills in the Danish language.

If the teaching in a subject has been carried through in a foreign language, the tests also have to be in this language, unless it is part of the test's purpose to document the student's skills in another language. Universities can disregard this rule.

A passed test cannot be retaken by the student. The student has three attempts to pass a test. The university can allow for further attempts if unusual circumstances allow this.

Certification

On completion of the education, the higher education institutions issue a diploma, which indicates the examinations taken and the marks obtained as well as the title/degree awarded. The diploma must contain a description of the programme with an account of its subject-composition.

Students who leave a programme without having passed the final examination are entitled to documentation of the examinations passed.

In an annexe to the certificate, the institutions issue a Diploma Supplement in English, which in accordance with the standard model developed by the European Commission, the Council of Europe and UNESCO/CEPES describes the competence provided by the programme, the contents, level and aim. Also, the Diploma Supplement provides information about the institution, the place of the institution and the programme in the Danish education system.

Until April 1st 2007, the Minister of Science, Innovation and Higher Education has according to the university act approved the study programmes the universities can offer. As of April 1st, the approval of university programmes was transferred from the ministry to a new Accreditation Agency. In the Ministerial order on bachelor and master’s programmes, it is stipulated which titles in Danish and English the universities can award.

The university issues certificates for successfully completed master programmes. Graduates must receive their certificates within two months of the last test being completed and the result published. In addition to the graduate’s name and the name of the university, the certificate must at least state:

• The title graduates are entitled to use in Danish and English

• The number of ECTS points of the entire programme

• Which bachelor programme or other programme leads to the master programme

• The subjects in which tests have been taken, or which have been documented in some other way, including the number of ECTS points

• Tests for which credits have been transferred

• The examination language if the test has been taken in a foreign language

• The assessment obtained and if appropriate, the overall average examination result

• A profile, which describes the programme


Third Cycle (PhD) Programmes


Organisation of Doctoral Studies

In Denmark two types of PhD programmes exist: The normal research PhD where the student is connected to a university or another higher educational institution while completing the PhD, and the Industrial PhD which is completed in connection with a company and an educational institution.

A PhD programme takes 3 years to complete (180 ECTS). It is possible to study a PhD within the same scientific areas which exist on bachelor and master level: humanities, natural science, social science, health science, technical science and theology.

The educational institutions can award a PhD within the subject areas where the institutions have research, and where they have established a PhD school. An educational institution can establish a PhD school alone or in cooperation with one or several institutions.

In the beginning of the PhD programme – and within three months – the student and the educational institution need to determine a research and an educational plan. The plan is to describe the project and the course, as well as a time schedule, a supervisor agreement, an agreement of possible copyrights and a financing plan. During the programme, the student is to conduct independent research and on that foundation write a thesis. Furthermore, the student needs to attend courses which are relevant for the research project. They have to correspond to six months of studies. Moreover, the student needs to actively engage in research environments, both at the educational institution and outside, e.g. abroad. Also, the student has to gain experience with teaching or another form of knowledge dissemination, e.g. dissemination of the research results.

On the basis of a statement from the supervisor, the educational institution continually needs to assess whether or not the student's course is running as planned or if it perhaps should be terminated.

At the final examination, a jury provides a recommendation on whether the project proves that the student independently can make use of the subject's sci-entific methods. Hereafter, the student has to defend the project at a public defense where he or she is examined by the jury.

An educational institution can decide if a student can be enrolled as a PhD student before the master degree has been completed. However, this does not change the extent of the programme as the student still needs to complete the master programme. This is only possible for a few programmes.

Industrial PhD

The industrial PhD implies that the student is employed in a private or public company, where he or she carrys out a PhD project within a company's interest field. At the same time, the student needs to be enrolled at university or another higher educational institution.

The Industrial PhD has been developed in order to promote research and development in Danish business by educating researchers with an insight into the professional aspects of research and development. Furthermore, the scheme is meant to support the building of network and exchange between companies and Danish and/or foreign universities/research institutions.

Companies can apply for funding for a partial coverage of the expenses to an Industrial PhD. The industrial PhD scheme is administrated by the Danish Agency for Universities and Internationalisation.

Doctoral degrees

The higher educational institutions which are covered by the act on universities can award doctoral degrees and honorary doctoral degrees. The institutions can in those areas with associated master degrees represented in the institution award doctoral degrees.

People who have been awarded a doctoral degree or an honorary doctoral degree receive a diploma from the educational institution.

The award of a doctoral degree takes place on the basis of a thesis which is defended at an oral, public defense. The award of the doctoral degree is an ac-knowledgement of the fact that the writer has acquired a considerable scientific insight and maturity and with the thesis has brought science a step further.

People who have obtained a master degree or a PhD within a close related subject area has the right to hand in a doctoral thesis for evaluation. The educa-tional institutions can also allow for others to hand in a doctoral thesis.

The honorary doctoral degree can be awarded to scientists who believe to have made a valuable scientific contribution and where it is natural to award them with the highest scientific award.

Admission Requirements

Normally, a completed master degree is required in order to be enrolled as a PhD student. However, with a few programmes it is possible to be enrolled before a student has completed the master programme. In this case, the institution needs to make sure that the student is able to complete the master programme during the PhD programme. It is up to the educational institutions to decide who they wish to enroll on the programmes, but it has to appear from the institutions' internal rules which criteria the institutions use in the admission procedure.

Most applicants apply for PhD programmes via job ads on available PhD scholarships. The applicant has to write an application and provide a detailed study plan which shows what the PhD project is to centre around.

For some available PhD scholarships the subject has been decided upon beforehand. In others, the applicant/student has the option to decide for themselves when formulating the application.

Status of Doctoral Students/Candidates

PhD students is generally employed in a position as a PhD fellow. This means that the PhD students are employed in a position with salary. The employment covers the educational period of three years. Pension is included in the salary. Industrial PhD students receives salary from the company they are employed in.

Supervision Arrangements

When enrolling, each PhD-student is allocated an official supervisor who must be a permanently tenured university teacher. The supervisor has to be an acknowledged researcher within the relevant subject area. In addition to giving subject-specific and study-related guidance, this supervisor must see to it that the study including planned course participation is running satisfactorily and proceeding according to plan. Within three months of the start of the PhD programme, the university shall approve a research and study plan (the PhD plan) for the individual PhD student. At regular points in time during the PhD programme, the university shall assess whether the PhD student is following the PhD plan and, if necessary, adjust the plan. The university shall lay down internal rules on the frequency of such assessments In connection with the PhD programme, the educational institution offers the student a teaching course and teaching guidance.

Also, the institution makes sure that the necessary resources are available for the student so that he or she can complete the programme as in accordance with the PhD plan.

The institution determines internal rules for the guidance of the PhD student.

Assessment

The educational institution regularly assesses throughout the PhD programme if the PhD student follows the PhD plan and make adjustments if that is needed. The assessment is made on the basis of an evaluation from the main supervisor, who after talks with the PhD student confirms that the programme is being carried through in accordance with the PhD plan, or in writing explains necessary adjustments. The PhD student is given the possibility of submitting any remarks to the evaluation. Any remarks have to be submitted within two weeks. At the assessment, the educational institution needs to consider documented illness, maternity leave and other forms of approved leave. The educational institution determines internal rules concerning the frequency of these assessments.

If the educational institution assesses that the PhD student no longer follows the PhD plan despite possible adjustments, the institution gives the student three months to improve the situation. The three months cannot lead to an extension of the PhD programme. The institution conducts a new assessment after the three months. The enrollment will end if the assessment after the three months is negative.

The PhD thesis has to document the student's ability to make use of the subject's scientific methods and provide research abilities corresponding to the international standards for PhD degrees within the same discipline.

The educational institution determines internal rules concerning the preparation and submission of the PhD thesis.

The PhD student's enrollment at the educational institution terminates when submitting the thesis. The main supervisor has to provide a statement on the whole PhD course a week after the submission of the thesis. If the supervisor in his or hers statement argues that the PhD programme has not been completed with satisfaction, the student has two weeks to put forward his or hers remarks to the supervisor's statement. The thesis can only be taken into consideration if the whole PhD programme has been completed satisfactorily.

An evaluation jury is set up by the educational institution after the submission of the PhD thesis. The jury consists of three members and one is appointed as the chairman. The members of the jury have to be acknowledged researchers within the relevant subject area. The members have to come from outside the educational institution, and one has to come from abroad (unless this is inappropriate from an academic perspective). The supervisors of the PhD project cannot be members of the jury. The main supervisor is involved but cannot vote.

The student is informed as soon as the jury has been set up and has a week to oppose any members of the jury.

Two months after the submission of the thesis, at the latest, the jury reports to the educational institution if the thesis is suitable as a basis for the award of the PhD degree. The student receives a copy of the report. The defense of the thesis can take place if the thesis is found suitable. If the thesis has not been found suitable, the jury will report if the thesis can be resubmitted in a revised form. The student and the supervisor have two weeks to comment the report. Has the thesis not been found suitable, the educational institution will make one of the following decisions on the basis of the jury's report and the supervisor's and student's comments:

• The defense cannot take place

• The thesis can be submitted again in a revised form within a deadline of three months. If the thesis is resubmitted, the thesis is evaluated once more by the jury, unless special circumstances prevent this.

• The thesis will be evaluated by a new jury

The PhD thesis is defended at a public defense after internal rules determined by the educational institution. At the defense, the student has to explain the work and defend the thesis in front of the jury's member. The institution needs to make sure that the thesis is publicly available in due time before the defense.

The educational institution determines time and place for the public defense.

Certification

Soon after the student's defense of the PhD thesis, the evaluation jury recommends if the PhD degree is to be awarded and reports this recommendation to the educational institution and the student. The recommendation has to be well grounded and if there is disagreement in the jury, the decision will rest upon the voting majority. The educational institution issues a diploma for the PhD degree. The diploma is issued in Danish and in English and has to contain information on subject area and topic for the PhD thesis as well as information on the completed PhD programme.

If the PhD degree is not awarded, the educational institution will, after request, issue documentation in Danish and in English that parts of the PhD programme have been completed.


Copyright © European Union 1995-2014










EuroEducation Net | admin@euroeducation.net
Copyright©EuroEducation || Terms of Use | Disclaimer | Cookie Policy